RESPONSIBLE DISRUPTION

How can we encourage an atmosphere of collaboration and responsible disruption in the nuclear security field? By ensuring that all feel empowered to contribute. In my mind, the first barrier to that empowerment is whether or not you see yourself and your ideas as legitimate. Given that legitimacy is in many ways a product of public opinion, part of the mission is to influence the way the public considers who is a legitimate voice on nuclear issues and what ideas are both credible and justified.

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Bonnie Jenkins
In Search of Peace, the U.S. Must Not Sacrifice the Rights of Afghan Women

Following a stalematein December 2018, the United States recently resumed direct peace talks with Taliban officials in Doha, Qatar, in the hope of bringing an end to the 17-year-long war in Afghanistan. When Operation Enduring Freedom began on October 7, 2001, no one anticipated that the war would last this long—or be this costly. Yet, recent peace talks mark the first time in nine years of intermittent peace efforts that all sides appear to be serious about reaching a deal.

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Bonnie Jenkins
A Peace Treaty Could Be Essential to North Korean Nuclear Denuclearization

As the second summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un approaches, the U.S. continues to focus its attention on the dismantlement of North Korea’s nuclear program.

Yes, but: If Trump is serious about denuclearizing North Korea, he should also use the summit with Kim Jong-un to take steps toward negotiating a peace agreement and formally ending the Korean War, noting the diplomatic engagements that have taken place between North and South Korea in 2017 that help to ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

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Bonnie Jenkins
Managing risk: Nuclear weapons in the new geopolitics

Since the end of the Cold War, more attention has been given to nuclear non-proliferation issues at large than to traditional issues of deterrence, strategic stability, and arms control. Given the state of current events and the re-emergence of great power competition, we are now starting to see a rebalance, with a renewed focus on questions of stability and arms control. In August 2017, Brookings Vice President and Director of Foreign Policy Bruce Jones convened eight Brookings scholars and affiliates—Madelyn Creedon, Robert Einhorn, Bonnie Jenkins, Suzanne Maloney, Michael O’Hanlon, Jung Pak, Frank Rose, and Strobe Talbott—to discuss the shifting balance and prioritization of strategic stability and non-proliferation. 

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Another Furlough: The Desire to Serve Tested Again

Public service is a calling to serve others and to be proud of one’s work each day, even knowing that despite dedicating oneself to helping others that such dedication will often go unappreciated and in some cases, disrespected. But to be relegated to no more than a pawn during Congressional and Presidential funding and political disputes is unacceptable. 

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Bonnie Jenkins
Russia's election interference exposes America's Achilles' heel: Race

The tweet ranked among the top performers of Russia’s U.S. election interference operation. Let’s call it outraged working guy. It features an image of a black man with a uniformed white police officer writing something in the background. The text above the images describes an encounter that began after someone called the police on the black man, a cable worker, while he was on a job.

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Bonnie Jenkins
Bonnie Jenkins | In Her Own Words

I got started in this field in Washington D.C. while working as a Presidential Management Fellow. I’d received my Master’s in Public Administration and my Juris Doctorate degree. It was then that a mentor at the Pentagon in the International Law office asked me to a meeting where he was giving legal advice on strategic arms reduction.

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Bonnie Jenkins
Remembering 41: The foreign policy legacy of President George HW Bush

As our country mourns Bush 41’s recent passing, we are reminded of his extraordinary legacy of service. A legacy filled with so many remarkable achievements and accolades, including an unprecedented strong foreign policy background that created a pathway of success for United States global leadership entering the post-Cold War period. His success helped transform the United States into the most powerful country in the world.

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Bonnie Jenkins
Cultural Bias Clouds US Policies on Weapons of Mass Destruction

Many recent US policies regarding weapons of mass destruction (WMD) use and proliferation involve not only Russia but countries like North Korea, Iran, Syria and in some cases China, India, and Pakistan. The US also has many WMD threat reduction programs, to prevent WMD terrorism, in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. The multitude of these policies and programs are focused on regions of the world that are populated by people of color. At the same time, few people of color take part in the decision-making on those policies and programs, or in the implementation of those programs.

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Bonnie Jenkins
Berlin Protests Highlight Need for Sound Employment Discrimination Laws in Germany

This past weekend, tens of thousands of protestors gathered in Berlin to take part in a demonstration to support an “open and free” German society. Organizers planned the #unteilbar demonstration (#indivisible in English) in response to the rise of the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD), which is now the largest opposition party to Chancellor Angela Merkel’s governing coalition. The demonstration also follows far-right protests that took place in the eastern city of Chemnitz in August.

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Bonnie Jenkins
Gender and WMD: Deliberate Actions to Upend the Status Quo

It is no secret that more men than women have traditionally worked in nonproliferation, arms control, and disarmament, especially as policymakers. But given that women constitute around 45% of the world’s labor force, the extent to which this remains true today is, well, something of a bombshell. According to the website for the State Department’s Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, only 5 of the 17individuals that comprise its leadership are women. 

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