WCAPS Art Forum Curator, Hannah Traore

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Hannah Traore is a recent graduate of Skidmore College where she received a Magna Cum Laude in Art History with a minor in Studio Art & Honors Forum. She recently was curator of "Africa Pop Studio" at the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore, and is Founder and Director of Arts Day at the YMCA, Saratoga Springs, New York.     


Sadie Bernette

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Regarding her work, Sadie Barnette said, “This is abstraction in service of everyday magic and survival in America.” Using text, glitter, family Polaroids, subculture codes and found objects, Barnette confronts the systematic racism that exists in America. Multi-talented, her work spans the realms of drawing, photography and large-scale installation. Barnette’s recent work focuses on the 500-page FBI surveillance file kept on her father, Rodney Barnette, who founded the Compton, California, chapter of the Black Panther Party in 1968. Using pink spray paint, glitter, and crystals, Barnette uses these primary source documents to engage in an intergenerational reclamation of power. Barnette asserts, “I am the Oakland 80’s baby of the radical and armed movement of love, the interracial, outer-spacial, and of disco idealism. I am the improbable celebration of my parents’ acts of resistance, gender defiant grace, fierce Midwestern kindness, dearly protected optimism and humor.”

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WCAPS Art Forum Discussions

The WCAPS Arts and Policy Forum panel discussions highlight local women of color artists whose work reflect the themes of peace, security, and conflict. The Art Forum seeks to create a safe space to encourage new ways of understanding how issues of peace, security and conflict affect women of color globally. These discussions seek to promote engagement of women of color in peace and security along with artists to raise awareness and target young women who may find interest in peace and security issues through a different medium. The first such panel discussion took place on June 21st at NYU’s Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics. Additional panel discussions are being planned.

Anita Alvin Nilert of Art to Zebras is art advisor for WCAPS and the organizer of these discussions.

Thu 6/21 | Screening & Discussion | Women, Race, And Dignity: This Ain’t A Eulogy

Below is the video recording from the WCAPS Art Forum’s inaugural event: a screening of Taja Lindley’s short film, This Ain’t A Eulogy: A Ritual for Re-Membering. The screening was followed by a discussion between Lindley and Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins on the intersections of women, race, and dignity in our society, through the lens of art and policy. The event was presented by Art to Zebras, New York University Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, and WCAPS. The event took place at the Hemispheric Institute in New York. 

 

Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins, Taja Lineley, and Hannah Traore, at the June 21st WCAPS Peace, Security and Art event also hosted by the NYU Hemispheric Institute and with Art for Zebras.


Tony Gum

Tony Gum uses irony in her photographs to comment on the precarious nature of water in her home country of South Africa. Her striking, bright photographs combine traditional water practices with the more modern evils of capitalism. She positions a coke create on her head the asme way a water bucket would be traditionally placed. The alteration though, is more sinister than it appears. Diabetes is a growing epidemic in South Africa as more and more sugary drinks flow into the country. Safe drinking water on the other hand, is not available.

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Tony Gum

Tony Gum


Performance for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women


"Make Change" Anoushaka Shankar, India


Hazel Scott was a magnificent pianist and outspoken on issues of inequality and civil rights.

"This Ain't A Eulogy" - Taja Lindley

Based on Taja Lindley's solo healing performance ritual that debuted at La Mama's SQUIRTS in 2015, "This Ain't A Eulogy" is drawing parallels between discarded materials and the violent treatment of Black people in the United States. People in the African Diaspora have a long history of repurposing, remixing, and transforming oppressive systems into valuable cultural practices. 


Art from Joanne Michelle Ocampo, WCAPS Young Ambassador

A limited number of prints are available from Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo's art below. Prices vary according to size, print and other materials. Proceeds go to WCAPS and other non-governmental organizations supporting work in health, security, and promoting diversity. Contact wcaps@wcapsnet.org for more information.

Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo discusses the significance of her piece "Loss" and some of the inspiration behind her work.

BEAUTIFUL  "Beauty is when you combine elements within you with what's around you." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

BEAUTIFUL "Beauty is when you combine elements within you with what's around you." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

LOSS.  "Lift up those drowning in the tears of war and conflict." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

LOSS. "Lift up those drowning in the tears of war and conflict." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

REACH.  "Life is about the legacy you leave behind, so reach out a hand when you can." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

REACH. "Life is about the legacy you leave behind, so reach out a hand when you can." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

TREASURE  "Don't forget to look inwards for that's where you keep your gold." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

TREASURE "Don't forget to look inwards for that's where you keep your gold." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

STRENGTH  "Turn heavy burdens into milestones of success." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.

STRENGTH "Turn heavy burdens into milestones of success." Acrylic on canvas. Joanne Michelle Fernandez Ocampo, 2017.